22 December 2017

Negotiating and implementing the UK’s withdrawal from the EU is the Government’s most important job over the coming years. But Brexit rarely features in its Single Departmental Plans, says Lewis Lloyd.

21 December 2017

This is the year Parliament started to get to grips with Brexit. And it will dominate 2018 to an even greater extent, argues Maddy Thimont Jack.

21 December 2017

The UK and EU both made compromises during the past year of negotiations. But they face even more difficult decisions in 2018, says Tim Durrant.

21 December 2017

The UK needs to be ready for every possible Brexit outcome, but the challenges are big and time is short. 2018 will be the year where the purse strings are loosened and hopes are pinned on transition, argues Joe Owen.

20 December 2017

Staff turnover in the civil service is a constant problem. But we should be particularly concerned about the rate of churn in the department managing Brexit, argues Jill Rutter.

15 December 2017

The Liaison Committee is finally up and running and will question the Prime Minister on Wednesday. Dr Hannah White argues that the committee needs to up its game and increase the impact of all select committees.

14 December 2017

EFTA Court President Carl Baudenbacher has proposed his court as a mechanism for enforcing the UK’s agreements with the EU after Brexit. The EFTA Court is a technically attractive solution, but one with political costs, says Lewis Lloyd.

12 December 2017

The performance of ministers since Friday’s Brexit deal is undermining confidence in the UK. That will cost us in negotiations and will do nothing to reassure business, argues Jill Rutter.

08 December 2017

The Prime Minister’s early morning dash to Brussels has resulted in a European Commission recommendation of "sufficient progress". Jill Rutter looks at what this means for future talks.

07 December 2017

The Treasury’s newly published timetable for future Budgets shows that the move to one fiscal event a year can bring improvements in tax policy making, says Alice Lilly.

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