14 November 2018

The Prime Minister is concluding her withdrawal deal. Many find it unappealing, but Jill Rutter asks if there was ever a better option on the table given where we were starting from.

13 November 2018

When it comes to the Irish border after Brexit, the Government has painted itself into a corner by making too many promises to too many people, says Tim Durrant.

08 November 2018

A disturbing pattern of poorly-briefed Home Office ministers is emerging. Benoit Guerin says that to reverse this trend, the forthcoming review of the department’s processes needs to focus on improving advice.

08 November 2018

Alex Stojanovic argues that it is EU law, not WTO rules, that matters in the event of a no deal Brexit.

05 November 2018

Jeremy Heywood was a great friend to the Institute for Government, but more importantly was an example of just how good the civil service can be. 

01 November 2018

There is no excuse for the appalling show put on by Caroline Nokes and her officials at the select committee earlier this week. Jill Rutter says the Government now needs to put out its definitive advice on EU citizens after Brexit immediately to rectify the damage.

29 October 2018

The Chancellor hasn’t ended austerity. And he’s also missed the opportunity to have an honest conversation with the public about how he plans to pay for public services, says Gemma Tetlow.

25 October 2018

The role of the European Court of Justice in settling disputes over the Brexit Withdrawal Agreement was one of the issues unresolved in March. Raphael Hogarth says the emerging agreement deserves a cautious welcome.

25 October 2018

Philip Hammond’s Budget must more clearly articulate his ambitions for reducing public borrowing. This would lay the groundwork for a more serious public conversation about the scope for public spending and the need for tax rises, argues Gemma Tetlow.

25 October 2018

Philip Hammond must use the Budget to set out a radically different way of running the next Spending Review. Otherwise it will unravel painfully, argues Martin Wheatley.

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