15 November 2017

Michael Gove’s proposal of a new environment watchdog after Brexit will allay some fears but he needs to be clear about its remit if it is going to fill the 'governance gap', argues Jill Rutter.

13 November 2017

The delayed EU Withdrawal Bill finally returns to the Commons this week. Jill Rutter argues that the Government needs to engage with Parliament properly if the timetable for scrutiny is not to be compressed further.

10 November 2017

Brexit spending is being micro-managed by the Treasury. The Chancellor must relax the purse strings and use the Budget to properly fund Brexit preparations, argues Joe Owen.

07 November 2017

The changing membership of Cabinet committees indicates that the Government is gearing up for the second phase of the Brexit negotiations, argues Jill Rutter.

01 November 2017

The Brexit Secretary says that no matter what happens with EU negotiations, “we will have some sort of basic deal”. Alex Stojanovic argues that even the most basic deal will be difficult to agree and disruptive to trade.

20 October 2017

The European Council’s endorsement of its pre-prepared conclusions hand the Prime Minister sufficient encouragement to see her through to December. But Jill Rutter argues the next meeting will prove a tougher test.

20 October 2017

The Government still hasn’t announced when the EU Withdrawal Bill will return to Parliament. Dr Hannah White says its absence will have an impact on both the Brexit negotiations and the Government’s ability to deliver Brexit-related legislation in time.

18 October 2017

At the first official meeting of the Joint Ministerial Committee on Brexit in eight months, some progress was finally made. Akash Paun hopes this is more than another false dawn.

16 October 2017

Labour’s Sir Keir Starmer and the Conservatives’ Ken Clarke both say that Parliament should reject a ‘no deal’ outcome on Brexit. Raphael Hogarth argues that this is an issue on which parliamentarians are less powerful than they might hope.

12 October 2017

David Davis and Michel Barnier agree that citizens’ rights should have “direct effect” after Brexit, but Raphael Hogarth argues that it is still far from clear that the UK has found a way to break the deadlock on enforcement.

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