24 March 2017

Next week Theresa May has to write her "Dear Donald" letter to the European Council President, Donald Tusk. But, Jill Rutter says, there is no script for this unprecedented move – so how might she decide to start the long goodbye?

24 March 2017

When Article 50 is triggered next week, the Brexit negotiations can begin. Oliver Ilott analyses the timeline and argues Theresa May really only has just 12 months to negotiate the UK’s deal.

23 March 2017

While the main focus of Brexit in Parliament is on the action on the floor of both houses, Robert Buck notes the number of select committee inquiries into Brexit has grown dramatically. 

22 March 2017

The Scottish Parliament will soon vote on whether to back the Scottish Government plan to request that Westminster devolves the power to hold a second referendum on independence. Akash Paun (naively) hopes this will mark the start of a positive dialogue between the UK and Scottish governments.

20 March 2017

Pascal Lamy, former Director of the World Trade Organization (WTO), warns that a UK-EU free trade agreement will take five to six years. Oliver Ilott argues that the pressure of trying to agree a deal in two years means that government has to establish new, rapid processes for decision making in the negotiations

14 March 2017

Nicola Sturgeon confirmed she would seek a second referendum on Scottish independence. Akash Paun explains what happens next.

08 March 2017

Oliver Ilott argues that a meaningful vote on a final Brexit deal would be less meaningful than it first appears, but might still be a good idea.

07 March 2017

With the triggering of Article 50 only days away, Jill Rutter highlights three ways Brexit might affect the Budget calculations.

21 February 2017

Bronwen Maddox asks if the Trump presidency could actually make Brexit easier.

21 February 2017

The Government’s recent digital strategy says little about Brexit. Joe Owen says that technology should be front and centre of post-Brexit systems and services, but at the moment risks being seen as a distraction.

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