13 November 2017

The delayed EU Withdrawal Bill finally returns to the Commons this week. Jill Rutter argues that the Government needs to engage with Parliament properly if the timetable for scrutiny is not to be compressed further.

20 October 2017

The Government still hasn’t announced when the EU Withdrawal Bill will return to Parliament. Dr Hannah White says its absence will have an impact on both the Brexit negotiations and the Government’s ability to deliver Brexit-related legislation in time.

16 October 2017

Labour’s Sir Keir Starmer and the Conservatives’ Ken Clarke both say that Parliament should reject a ‘no deal’ outcome on Brexit. Raphael Hogarth argues that this is an issue on which parliamentarians are less powerful than they might hope.

12 October 2017

David Davis and Michel Barnier agree that citizens’ rights should have “direct effect” after Brexit, but Raphael Hogarth argues that it is still far from clear that the UK has found a way to break the deadlock on enforcement.

15 September 2017

The Government continues to receive criticism for its manoeuvres to control debate and scrutiny in the House of Commons. Dr Catherine Haddon argues that such battles also show the opportunities parliamentarians have to assert themselves.

04 September 2017

The Brexit domination of political debate seems unlikely to stop any time soon, argues Jill Rutter in previewing the upcoming September mini-session.

10 August 2017

The President of the Supreme Court made an extraordinary intervention of the status of European Court of Justice (ECJ) judgments after Brexit. Raphael Hogarth explains how Parliament could provide more clarity.

13 July 2017

The Government finally published its long-awaited bill to take us out of the EU. Jill Rutter warns there are many battles ahead.

06 July 2017

The Repeal Bill is the centrepiece of the Government’s legislative agenda for Brexit. Marcus Shepheard considers how the uncertainty it creates can be managed with smart drafting and effective scrutiny.

08 June 2017

Theresa May said that one reason for the snap election was to strengthen her mandate and tackle those still opposed to Brexit. Dr Catherine Haddon looks at how this applies to the House of Lords.

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