References

Summary

  1. See, for example, Rutter, J., ‘The Government is paying the price for poor parliamentary handling of Brexit’, Institute for Government, 13 November 2017.
  2. Andrews, E., Lilly, A., Campbell, L., McCrae, J., Douglas, R., and Bijl, J., Performance Tracker: Autumn 2017, Institute for Government, 19 October 2017.
  3. Freeguard, G., Boon, A., and Owen, L., ‘The new government, in nine charts’, Institute for Government, 20 July 2016.
  4. Rutter, T., ‘MPs urge civil service to “urgently get a grip” on DExEU staff churn’, Civil Service World, 5 December 2017.
  5. See also White, H., ‘Wasting parliamentary time’, Institute for Government, 4 May 2017.
  6. Freeguard, G., ‘Tory manifesto is their 2nd longest since 1945’, Twitter.com, 1 June 2017.
  7. Freeguard, G., ‘Single Departmental Plans have improved but they need to go further’, 2 January 2018.
  8. National Audit Office, Implementing the UK’s exit from the European Union: Infrastructure and Projects Authority, 24 November 2017.
  9. Andrews et al, op. cit., pp. 84–9.
  10. Warrell, H., ‘Home Office seeks 1,200 immigration workers before Brexit’, Financial Times, 17 October 2017; Blitz, J., ‘The Brexit headcount begins to balloon’, Financial Times, 1 November 2017; Rutter, T., ‘BEIS offers £80k to find out why its staff are leaving’, Civil Service World, 12 September 2017; Rutter, T., ‘Nearly 3,000 civil servants hired to work on Brexit’, Civil Service World, 31 October 2017; Heywood, J., ‘How the Civil Service is preparing for Brexit’, Civil Service blog, 7 July 2017.
  11. Skidmore, C., ‘Written Ministerial Statement: government accountability and transparency’, Cabinet Office, 14 December 2017; Cabinet Office/Government Digital Service, ‘How to publish central government transparency data’, GOV.UK, 14 December 2017.
  12. UK Government, ‘For public comment: UK Open Government National Action Plan 2016-18 Mid-term Self Assessment Report’, UK Open Government Network, 17 November 2017.
  13. Cabinet Office/Government Digital Service, Government Transformation Strategy, GOV.UK, 9 February 2017.
  14. Ilott, O., ‘In Brexit, transparency is a tool – and Europe is using it’, Institute for Government, 22 May 2017.
  15. Freeguard, G., ‘Hacking organograms: unlocking government data’, Institute for Government, 5 July 2017; Institute for Government, ‘Hacking Organograms: Unlocking government data, 28 July 2017’, Google Docs, last accessed 26 November 2017.
  16. Andrews et al, op. cit., pp. 76–7.

 

1 Political leadership

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

 

  1. May, T., ‘Theresa May’s general election speech announcement: full transcript’, Financial Times, 18 April 2017.
  2. Freeguard, G., and Cheung, A., ‘The 2017 General Election, in seven charts’, Institute for Government, 9 June 2017.
  3. Given the presence of the Speaker and the fact that Sinn Féin do not take their seven seats, a party wishing to form a majority government would need to break 322 seats.
  4. Kuenssberg, L., ‘Northern Ireland women to get free abortions in England: Analysis,’ BBC News, 29 June 2017.
  5. Bercow, J., ‘Universal Credit Roll-Out’, Hansard, column 957, 18 October 2017.
  6. Skinner, G., et al, ‘Theresa May’s leadership satisfaction ratings fall further after the General Election’, Ipsos MORI, 20 July 2017.
  7. See, for example, Parker, G., ‘Theresa May weighs cabinet reshuffl   after UK general election’, Financial Times, 8 June 2017.
  8. Freeguard, G., Campbell, L., Cheung, A., Lilly, A., and Baker, C., ‘Cabinet Reshuffle live blog: January 2018’, Institute for Government, 8–9 January 2018.
  9. We have included Ian Duncan’s appointment at the Scotland Office in these calculations, given the intention to raise him to the peerage was announced on 20 June. We have not included him as a Wales Office minister, since it remains unclear when he was appointed to that position. See Prime Minister’s Office, 10 Downing Street, ‘Full list of new ministerial and government appointments: June 2017’, GOV.UK, 20 June 2017, and Cornock, D., ‘New minister yet to work in Wales since starting job’, BBC Wales, 14 September 2017.
  10. For more on spads, see Institute for Government, ‘Special advisers’.
  11. Waterson, J., and Ball, J., ‘Theresa May’s Head Of Policy Is Leaving Downing Street’, BuzzFeed, 21 June 2017. See also Freeguard, G., ‘I *think* this is what’s happened to the Spads who were at No 10 on December 2016’, Twitter.com, 21 June 2017.
  12. For more information, see Institute for Government, ‘Cabinet Committees’, 4 August 2017.
  13. Forsyth, J. and Nelson, F., ‘Theresa May: I get so frustrated with Whitehall’, The Spectator, 10 December 2016.
  14. Freeguard, G., Adam, R., Andrews, E., and Boon, A., Whitehall Monitor 2017: The civil service as it faces Brexit, Institute for Government, 26 January 2017, pp. 20–1; Thornton, D., ‘What can we learn from the latest cyber- attack on Parliament?’, Institute for Government, 26 June 2017.
  15. Merrick, R., ‘Cabinet reshuffle: David Lidington takes over from Damian Green as Cabinet Office minister but is not given First Secretary of State title’, The Independent, 9 January 2018.
  16. The Prime Minister’s Office, ‘Ministerial appointments: January 2018’, GOV.UK, 9 January 2018.
  17. Cheung, A., ‘Select Committee chair elections 2017, in six charts’, Institute for Government, 13 July 2017; ‘Sarah Wollaston elected Chair of Liaison Committee’, UK Parliament, 13 November 2017.

 

2 Workforce

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

  • Office for National Statistics, Public Sector Employment, published quarterly (most recent release Q3 2017)
  • Office for National Statistics, Annual Civil Service Employment Survey (most recent data as of March 2017), supplemented by the more detailed breakdowns available via NOMIS, bespoke cuts of the data provided by the Office for National Statistics, and Senior Civil Service data from the Cabinet Office
  • Announcements of permanent secretary appointments on GOV.UK supplemented by Institute for Government research
  • Cabinet Office, Civil Service People Survey, 2009–17, published annually (most recent release in November 2017). The way that three theme scores are calculated – Organisational objectives and purpose, Resources and workload, and Leadership and managing change – has changed this year, and we have used the adjusted scores published this year for 2009 to 2016.

 

  1. Freeguard, G., Adam, R., Andrews, E., and Boon, A., Whitehall Monitor 2017: The civil service as it faces Brexit, Institute for Government, 26 January 2017, pp. 22–3; Boon, A., ‘Civil Service staff numbers Q2 2016: how big is Whitehall as it prepares for Brexit?’, Institute for Government, 15 September 2016.
  2. Civil Service, The Civil Service Reform Plan, 10 June 2012.
  3. In its Public Sector Employment releases, the Office for National Statistics notes changes and transfers between civil service organisations, but not always between the civil service and other public bodies.
  4. Eustice, G., answer to ‘Departmental Responsibilities: Written question – 54407’, parliament.uk, 25 November 2016. See also Moriarty, C., ‘How Defra is adapting to the challenge of Brexit’, Civil Service Quarterly, 1 November 2016.
  5. National Audit Office, Implementing the UK’s Exit from the European Union: The Department for Exiting the European Union and the centre of government, 17 November 2017, pp. 8–9.
  6. Owen, J., Implementing Brexit: Immigration, Institute for Government, 4 May 2017; Warrell, H., ‘Home Office seeks 1,200 immigration workers before Brexit’, Financial Times, 17 October 2017.
  7. Blitz, J., ‘The Brexit headcount begins to balloon’, Financial Times, 1 November 2017.
  8. Rutter, T., ‘BEIS offers £80k to find out why its staff are leaving’, Civil Service World, 12 September 2017.
  9. Rutter, T., ‘Nearly 3,000 civil servants hired to work on Brexit’, Civil Service World, 31 October 2017. See also Heywood, J., ‘How the Civil Service is preparing for Brexit’, Civil Service blog, 7 July 2017
  10. For a fuller explanation and exploration of grade, see Institute for Government, ‘Grade structures of the civil service’, 24 November 2017.
  11. Ibid.
  12. For more detail, see Institute for Government, ’Age’, forthcoming, as part of the Whitehall Monitor project.
  13. National Audit Office, Central government staff costs, 5 June 2015.
  14. For more detail, see Institute for Government, ’Age’, forthcoming, as part of the Whitehall Monitor project.
  15. National Audit Office, Central government staff costs, 5 June 2015; White, S., Review of HM Treasury’s response to the financial crisis 2007–09, HM Treasury, 29 March 2012; National Audit Office, Implementing the UK’s Exit from the European Union – People and skills: The role of the centre of government, 1 December 2017, p. 18.
  16. See, for example, National Audit Office, Central government staff costs, 5 June 2015, p. 14; Cabinet Office, A Brilliant Civil Service: becoming the UK’s most inclusive employer, GOV.UK, 16 October 2017. Examples of age receiving some attention include Bassis, B., ‘Taking action on age diversity in Defra’, Defra Digital, 24 November 2017.
  17. For more detail, see Institute for Government, ‘Gender balance in the civil service’, 20 October 2017.
  18. The most accessible view is agendaNi, ‘New permanent secretaries appointed’, 1 July 2016.
  19. DWP, ‘Sir Robert Devereux plans to retire as DWP Permanent Secretary in January’, GOV.UK, 11 October 2017; DWP, ‘Appointment of Peter Schofield as Permanent Secretary at the Department for Work and Pensions’, GOV.UK, 12 January 2018.
  20. DWP, Family Resources Survey: financial year 2015/16, GOV.UK, 16 March 2017.
  21. Cabinet Office, A Brilliant Civil Service: becoming the UK’s most inclusive employer, GOV.UK, 16 October 2017, p. 7.
  22. Civil Service, Collection: Talent Action Plan, GOV.UK, first published 26 March 2015; Civil Service, ‘Civil Service Diversity Champions’, GOV.UK; most recent permanent secretary objectives are for 2015 to 2016, at Civil Service, ‘Permanent Secretaries’ Objectives 2015 to 2016’, 19 February 2017.
  23. Cabinet Office, A Brilliant Civil Service: becoming the UK’s most inclusive employer, GOV.UK, 16 October 2017, p. 4.
  24. ibid., p. 30. On the Fast Stream, see Adam, R., ‘The Civil Service Fast Stream in six charts’, Institute for Government, 9 February 2017.
  25. Prime Minister’s Office, 10 Downing Street, PM words at Race Disparity Audit launch, GOV.UK, 10 October 2017. See also Freeguard, G., ‘Race audit: Why data-informed honesty (and transparency) is the best policy’, Institute for Government, 10 October 2017.
  26. Conservative and Unionist Party, Forward, Together: Our Plan for a Stronger Britain and a Prosperous Future, May 2017, p. 34.
  27. Johnstone, R., ‘Over 20 public bodies will be created by Brexit, says Cabinet Office minister’, Civil Service World, 28 July 2017.
  28. For more on specialisms, see Institute for Government, ‘Specialisms in the civil service’, 8 August 2017.
  29. See, for example, National Audit Office, Capability in the Civil Service, 24 March 2017.
  30. McCrae, J., and Gold, J., Professionalising Whitehall, Institute for Government, 7 September 2017.
  31. See Freeguard et al, op. cit., pp. 31–2 and Freeguard, G., ‘Brexit Whitehall’s morale in good health – except at Health’, Institute for Government, 30 November 2016.
  32. See Coates, S., ‘Ministry seeks help to solve mystery of disappearing staff’, The Times, 12 September 2017; Rutter, T., ‘BEIS offers £80k to find out why its staff are leaving’, Civil Service World, 12 September 2017; Greenway, A., ‘BEIS will pay to know why staff are leaving? I claim my £80,000’, Civil Service World, 13 September 2017; BEIS, ‘PS17191 BEIS Exit Interview’, Contracts Finder, 8 September 2017.

 

3 Finances

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

 

  1. HM Treasury, Public Expenditure Statistical Analyses 2017, 19 July 2017.
  2. HM Treasury, Budget June 2010, 22 June 2010.
  3. HM Treasury, Spending Review and Autumn Statement 2015, 25 November 2015.
  4. HM Treasury, Autumn Statement 2016, 23 November 2016.
  5. HM Treasury, Public Expenditure Statistical Analyses 2017, 19 July 2017.
  6. HMT is not included in the chart showing the composition of TME by department due to it having negative spending figures for Resource AME, Capital DEL, and Capital AME. For even more detail on departmental spending, see Institute for Government, ‘Departmental budgets’, 8 November 2017.
  7. Adams, R., ‘New funding formula for English schools is “recycling”, say heads’, The Guardian, 14 September 2017.
  8. Andrews, E., Lilly, A., Campbell, L., McCrae, J., Douglas, R., and Bijl, J., Performance Tracker: Autumn 2017, Institute for Government, 19 October 2017.
  9. Hammond, P., Autumn Budget 2017, HM Treasury, 22 November 2017.
  10. Figures in this section have been restated in 2016/17 prices, despite the most recent year of data being 2015/16. This has been done to be consistent with other sections of this chapter where figures have been stated in 2016/17 prices.
  11. GOV.UK, Tax relief when you donate to a charity, as at 24 November 2017; HMRC, VAT Notice 714: zero rating young children’s clothing and footwear, 23 March 2015.
  12. Office for Budget Responsibility, Annex A – Autumn Budget 2017 policy decisions, 24 November 2017
  13. Rutter, J., Dodwell, B., Johnson, P., Crozier, G., Cullinane, J., Lilly, A., and McCarthy, E., Better Budgets, Chartered Institute of Taxation, Institute for Fiscal Studies, and Institute for Government, 16 January 2017.
  14. HM Treasury, Whole of Government Accounts: year ended 31 March 2016, 13 July 2017. Figures have been restated in 2016/17 prices to be consistent with figures elsewhere in the chapter.
  15. For financial years towards the end of a spending review period, there are more Budgets that are considered ‘in audit’, as there is a longer gap between the spending review and the first outturn figures appearing in annual reports. This means that recurring penalties for poor transparency in budget publications (e.g. for HMRC and HMT) have a larger impact on the overall score. In the years towards the start of the spending review period there are fewer Budgets ‘in audit’, which means that recurring penalties for poor transparency in annual reports (e.g. DfID for not publishing depreciation figures) carry greater relative weight.
  16. This refers to DWP’s spending in DEL only, although most of DWP’s AME is also devolved.
  17. Prior to this, the Scottish variable rate of income tax operated between 1999 and 2016 (which allowed rates to be varied by up to 3p) and the Scottish rate of income tax operated for the 2016/17 financial year (which allowed rates to be varied by up to 10p), however neither of these powers was used.
  18. House of Commons Library, Corporation Tax in Northern Ireland, 28 September 2017.

 

4 Managing public spending

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

 

  1. Cabinet Office, Classification Of Public Bodies: Guidance For Departments, 26 April 2016.
  2. Pearson, J., Gash, T., and Rutter, J., Out of the ashes, 4 March 2015. See also Rutter, J., Gash, T., Magee, I., and Smith, N., Read Before Burning: How to increase the effectiveness and accountability of quangos, Institute for Government, 15 July 2010.
  3. Rutter et al (2010), op. cit., pp. 12–5.
  4. Cabinet Office, Public Bodies 2017, 30 November 2017
  5. Baroness Anelay of St Johns, Regulation: Written question – HL1858, Hansard, 10 October 2017; Cabinet Office,
  6. Public Bodies 2017, 30 November 2017.< >Peston, R., ’Government to U-turn on police funding reform to protect Met budget’, ITV News, 20 June 2017; BBC News, ‘“Historic” schools funding change confirmed’, 14 September 2017; Jameson, H., and Peters, D., ‘Queen’s speech fails to mention reforms to local government finance’, LocalGov, 21 June 2017.
  7. National Audit Office, Government grant services, 3 July 2014.
  8. Cabinet Office, UK Open Government National Action Plan 2016–18, 12 May 2016.
  9. The grants register does record the recipient of grants (e.g. local government, civil society, individuals); however, multiple types of recipient are recorded for over half of the grants (by value) without being broken down further, making it impossible to determine how much grant funding each type of grant recipient receives.
  10. HM Treasury, Whole of Government Accounts: year ended 31 March 2016, 13 July 2017.
  11. Freeguard, G., and Makgill, I., Government Contracting: Public data, private providers, Institute for Government and Spend Network, 26 June 2014.
  12. Denham, E., Freedom of information 250 years on – two challenges, two solutions, Information Commissioner’s Office, 9 December 2016.
  13. National Audit Office, The role of major contractors in the delivery of public services, 13 November 2013.
  14. House of Commons Committee of Public Accounts, Contracted out health and disability assessments, 31 March 2016.
  15. National Audit Office, Transforming contract management, 4 September 2014.
  16. Gash, T., ‘Gov must not ease up on efforts to improve contract management’, Institute for Government, 8 February 2017.

 

5 Passing legislation

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

 

  1. Byrne, G., ‘Legislation rushed through with little scrutiny’, Institute for Government, 4 May 2017.
  2. Haddon, C., ‘Election 2017: Putting the Fixed Term Parliaments Act into practice’, Institute for Government, 21 April 2017.
  3. Byrne, G., op. cit.
  4. Vehicle Technology and Aviation Bill: Explanatory notes, UK Parliament, 22 February 2017.
  5. Local Government Finance Bill: Explanatory notes, UK Parliament, 13 January 2017.
  6. Prisons and Courts Bill: Explanatory notes, UK Parliament, 23 February 2017.
  7. White, H., and Rutter, J., Legislating Brexit: the Great Repeal Bill and the wider legislative challenge, Institute for Government, March 2017, pp. 8–9.
  8. Prime Minister’s Office, 10 Downing Street, ‘Government to confirm two-year Parliament to deliver Brexit and beyond’, GOV.UK, 17 June 2017.
  9. Cabinet Office, Queen’s Speech 2017: background briefing notes, GOV.UK, 21 June 2017.
  10. Ibid.
  11. Institute for Government, EU Withdrawal Bill (Repeal Bill), Institute for Government, October 2017.
  12. Department for Exiting the European Union, ‘New bill to implement Withdrawal Agreement’, GOV.UK, 13 November 2017.
  13. Exiting the European Union Committee, First Report: European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, UK Parliament, 17 November 2017.
  14. Institute for Government, EU Withdrawal Bill (Repeal Bill), Institute for Government, October 2017.
  15. Mason, R., Asthana, A., and Elgot, J., ‘Theresa May expected to make concessions over Henry VIII powers’, The Guardian, 11 October 2017.
  16. Blackwell, J., and Fox, R., Westminster Lens: Parliament and Delegated Legislation in the 2015–16 Session, Hansard Society, 2017, p. 11.
  17. House of Commons Library, Acts and Statutory Instruments: the volume of UK legislation 1950 to 2016,April 2017.
  18. Blackwell, J., and Fox, R., op. cit., p. 12.
  19. Ibid., p. 5.
  20. Ibid., p. 20.
  21. Ibid., p. 5.
  22. For more information, see Institute for Government, EU Withdrawal Bill (Repeal Bill), Institute for Government, October 2017; Institute for Government, EU Withdrawal Bill: Amendments and Debates, Institute for Government, November 2017.
  23. Rutter, J., ‘The Government is paying the price for poor parliamentary handling of Brexit’, Institute for Government, 13 November 2017.
  24. Prime Minister’s Office, 10 Downing Street, Conservative and DUP agreement and UK Government financial support for Northern Ireland, GOV.UK, 26 June 2017.
  25. Haddon, C., ‘A Brief History of the Lib-Lab Pact, 1977–78’ in Hazell, R., and Paun, A. (eds), Making Minority Government Work: Hung Parliaments and the challenges for Westminster and Whitehall, Institute for Government and The Constitution Unit, p. 20.
  26. Haddon, C., ‘Votes of confidence, the Queen’s Speech and the Fixed-Term Parliament Act’, Institute for Government, 6 May 2015.
  27. Russell, M., ‘Take a closer look at the House of Lords: it may not be quite what you think,’ LSE British Politics and Policy blog, 18 July 2013.

 

6 Delivering major projects

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

  • Infrastructure and Projects Authority (previously Major Projects Authority), Annual reports, 2013–17 (data as of previous September), including some bespoke cuts kindly provided by the IPA
  • Cabinet Office, Civil Service People Survey, 2014–16. Although the 2017 Civil Service People Survey was published in November 2017, details of scores for different professions are not expected to be available until March 2018.

 

  1. Brecknell, S., ‘Civil service leaders must re-prioritise for Brexit, says chief John Manzoni’, Civil Service World, 9 November 2016
  2. Owen, J., Shepheard, M., and Stojanovic, A., Implementing Brexit: Customs, Institute for Government, 11 September 2017; and Owen, J., Implementing Brexit: Immigration, Institute for Government, 4 May 2017.
  3. National Audit Office, Implementing the UK’s exit from the European Union: Infrastructure and Projects Authority, 24 November 2017.
  4. For more detail, see Cheung, A., ‘Government delivery of major infrastructure – less is more’, Institute for Government, 20 July 2017.
  5. Institute for Government, ‘Big vs small infrastructure projects: does size matter?’, 5 June 2017.
  6. Freeguard, G., Adam, R., Andrews, E., and Boon, A., Whitehall Monitor 2017, Institute for Government, 26 January 2017.
  7. Cabinet Office, Infrastructure and Projects Authority: Annual Report on Major Projects 2016 to 2017, consolidated data and narratives, 18 July 2017.
  8. Cabinet Office, Appointment letters for Senior Responsible Owners, 5 March 2015.
  9. Cabinet Office, Infrastructure and Projects Authority: Annual Report on Major Projects 2015–16, 7 July 2016, p. 21.
  10. Cabinet Office, Major Projects Authority Annual Report 2013–2014, 23 May 2014.

 

 

7 Communication and transparency

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

  • Cabinet Office, Freedom of Information statistics, published quarterly (most recently on 14 December 2017). Previously published by the Ministry of Justice
  • House of Commons Procedure Committee, reports on written parliamentary question performance
  • Cabinet Office, written ministerial statements on ministerial correspondence, made annually
  • House of Commons, Sessional Returns
  • Select Committee reports and government responses, compiled from parliament.uk
  • Transparency International UK’s compilation of departmental hospitality releases, found on GOV.UK. These include details of meetings, hospitality and gifts declared by ministers, special advisers and senior officials (our analysis looks only at ministers) and are supposed to be published quarterly, a quarter in arrears. TI-UK will be launching a website soon. With thanks for further information from the Government Digital Service
  • Releases of spend over £25,000 published by departments on GOV.UK and data.gov.uk, supposed to be published monthly by the end of the following month. With thanks for further information provided to us by the Government Digital Service and data.gov.uk
  • Organograms published by departments on GOV.UK and data.gov.uk, supposed to be published for 31 March (by 6 June) and for 30 September (by 6 December). With thanks for further information provided to us by the Government Digital Service
  • Number of users, visits and publications on GOV.UK obtained through its Performance and Activity Dashboards.

 

  1. Public Administration Select Committee, More complaints please!, 26 March 2014.
  2. For more on ministerial correspondence, see Institute for Government, ‘Ministerial correspondence’.
  3. For more on Freedom of Information, see Institute for Government, ‘Freedom of Information’.
  4. Information Commissioner’s Office, The Guide to Freedom of Information, ICO, 14 August 2017.
  5. Wintour, P., ‘Speaker John Bercow reveals plan for revived House of Commons’, The Guardian, 10 June 2010.
  6. The House Divided: Politics, Procedure and Parliament, ‘Bercow’s Urgent Question revolution?’, 21 January 2012.
  7. White, H., ‘Wasting parliamentary time’, Institute for Government, 4 May 2017.
  8. Select Committees’, parliament.uk.
  9. Cameron, D., ‘Letter to government departments on opening up data’, GOV.UK, 31 May 2010.
  10. Transparency International UK will soon be launching a website allowing users to search through all of the hospitality releases.
  11. The most recent is at DExEU, ‘Department for Exiting the European Union: senior team organogram’, GOV.UK, 3 November 2017. Some previous releases are no longer available.
  12. Freeguard, G., ‘Hacking organograms: unlocking government data’, Institute for Government, 5 July 2017; Institute for Government, ‘Hacking Organograms: Unlocking government data, 28 July 2017’, Google Docs, last accessed 26 November 2017.
  13. GOV.UK, Performance, last accessed 26 November 2017. See Freeguard, G., Andrews, E., Devine, D., Munro, R., and Randall, J., Whitehall Monitor 2015: The Coalition in 163 charts, Institute for Government, pp. 98–107, for more.
  14. Asadi, R., ‘Help us give government better data about services’, Government Digital Service, 31 October 2016.
  15. DVLA, Dashboard: Vehicle tax renewals, GOV.UK, last accessed 26 November 2017.
  16. GDS, ‘Government Transformation Strategy role of the Government Digital Service’, GOV.UK.

 

 

8 Measuring performance

The data behind the charts in this chapter comes from:

  • Analysis of Single Departmental Plans published by government departments. The original analysis of priorities uses the original 19 February 2016 versions. Our analysis of when the plans were updated is based on the ‘full page history’ function on GOV.UK
  • The International Civil Service Effectiveness (InCiSE) index, the first annual report having been published on 6 July 2017. InCiSE is a collaboration between the Institute for Government and Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University, with support from UK civil service and funding from the Open Society Foundations
  • Ipsos MORI, Political Monitor, satisfaction with government scores, 2010 to November 2017.

 

 

  1. See, for example, Thomas, P., and Davison, N., Civil Service Reform in the Real World: Patterns of success in UK civil service reform, Institute for Government, 26 March 2014; Haddon, C., Reforming the Civil Service – The Efficiency Unit: The Efficiency Unit in the early 1980s and the 1987 Next Steps Report, Institute for Government, 18 May 2012; Gold, J., Tracking delivery: Global trends and warning signs in delivery units, Institute for Government, 27 April 2017; Freeguard, G., and Gold, J., Data-Driven Delivery: Lessons from the O’Malley Administration of Maryland, Institute for Government, 15 January 2015.
  2. Freeguard, G., Andrews, E., and Munro, R., Whitehall Monitor: Deep impact? How government measured its impact, 2010–15, Institute for Government, 2 April 2015.
  3. National Audit Office, Government’s management of its performance: progress with single departmental plans, 21 July 2016, p.14.
  4. Manzoni, J., ‘Clarifying our priorities – Single Departmental Plans’, Civil Service blog, 29 July 2015.
  5. McCrae, J., ‘Response to Single Departmental Plans’, Institute for Government, 19 February 2016; McCrae, J., ‘Single Departmental Plans: implementing the Government’s promises?’, Institute for Government, 26 February 2016; Freeguard, G., Adam, R., Andrews, E., and Boon, A., Whitehall Monitor 2017: The civil service as it faces Brexit, Institute for Government, 26 January 2017, pp. 63–6.
  6. PACAC, Accounting for democracy: making sure Parliament, the people and ministers know how and why public money is spent, UK Parliament, 27 April 2017, p. 56.
  7. Ibid., p. 50.
  8. National Audit Office, op. cit., pp. 14–7.
  9. PAC, Managing government spending and performance, UK Parliament, 9 March 2017, p. 3.
  10. HMT, Treasury Minutes: Government responses to the Committee of Public Accounts on the Twenty Sixth, the Twenty Seventh and the Twenty Ninth to the Thirty Fourth reports from Session 2016–17, March 2017, p. 6.
  11. Freeguard, G., ‘Tory manifesto is their 2nd longest since 1945’, Twitter.com, 1 June 2016.
  12. Home Office, Single Departmental Plan: 2015–20, GOV.UK, last updated 19 February 2016.
  13. Freeguard, G., Adam, R., Andrews, E., and Boon, A., Whitehall Monitor 2017: The civil service as it faces Brexit, Institute for Government, 26 January 2017, pp. 63–6; Hirst, O., and Freeguard, G., ‘Impermanent markers? Permanent secretary objectives, 2015–16’, Institute for Government, 14 April 2016.
  14. For more, see Freeguard, G., ‘Single Departmental Plans have improved but they need to go further’, Institute for Government, 2 January 2018.
  15. See, for example, Freeguard et al, op. cit., pp. 144.
  16. InCiSE, The International Civil Service Effectiveness (InCiSE) Index 2017, Institute for Government, 6 July 2017; Institute for Government, ‘International Civil Service Effectiveness Index (InCiSE)’.
  17. On openness, see the Summary of this report and (e.g.) Freeguard, G., Andrews, E., Devine, D., Munro, R., and Randall, J., Whitehall Monitor 2015: The Coalition in 163 charts, Institute for Government, pp. 15–8.