04 April 2018

April 2018 marks the latest step in the process of tax devolution. Akash Paun argues that these are important reforms, but the system is increasingly complex, making the case for a full review of how devolved and local government is funded.

03 April 2018

Data policy has moved to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Gavin Freeguard welcomes the move but says the Government needs to be clear about what it wants to do with all this data.

22 March 2018

The demands of Brexit have turned several government departments – like Defra and DExEU – into recruitment hotspots. And there will be more to come, says Aron Cheung, as departments like the Home Office and HMRC prepare to operate in a new landscape.

07 March 2018

Despite improvements in the representation of women in government, Charlotte Baker says that in politics and the civil service, significant barriers to seniority still remain.

16 January 2018

The debate over whether private finance is better value than public spending is heating up after Carillion’s collapse – but it is hampered by a lack of evidence on either side, says Graham Atkins.

08 January 2018

As Prime Minister Theresa May reshuffles her Cabinet, the Whitehall Monitor team - Gavin Freeguard, Lucy Campbell, Aron Cheung, Alice Lilly and Charlotte Baker - provide data and charts as events unfold. 

02 January 2018

The Government’s latest Single Departmental Plans are a huge improvement on their predecessors. But there is still some work to do to make them truly useful, argues Gavin Freeguard.

22 December 2017

Negotiating and implementing the UK’s withdrawal from the EU is the Government’s most important job over the coming years. But Brexit rarely features in its Single Departmental Plans, says Lewis Lloyd.

10 October 2017

Gavin Freeguard argues that the Prime Minister’s race disparity audit shows how data and transparency can help achieve political goals.

21 September 2017

A lack of transparency in the two departments at the heart of Brexit suggests the public cannot get hold of information about some of the most important activity in government at the moment, argues Aron Cheung.

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