Comment

16 January 2018

The Government has yet to set out its own analysis of the economic impact of Brexit, though many others have. A serious public debate about the kind of Brexit we want is needed, and the Government must lead this, argues Tim Durrant.

16 January 2018

The debate over whether private finance is better value than public spending is heating up after Carillion’s collapse – but it is hampered by a lack of evidence on either side, says Graham Atkins.

12 January 2018

The publication of the Government’s Areas of Research Interest is a positive step, but Whitehall still lacks a strategic approach to research and evidence, argues Tom Sasse.

09 January 2018

The Government should not let EU talks dominate 2018, argues Bronwen Maddox.

08 January 2018

As Prime Minister Theresa May reshuffles her Cabinet, the Whitehall Monitor team - Gavin Freeguard, Lucy Campbell, Aron Cheung, Alice Lilly and Charlotte Baker - provide data and charts as events unfold. 

05 January 2018

The Prime Minister wants a transition agreement by March in the hope of averting the Brexit cliff-edge and offering some certainty. But the cliff-edge can only be delayed and uncertainty will continue, argues Joe Owen.

05 January 2018

The track record of public inquiries in delivering change is patchy. Parliament must have a bigger role in scrutinising the implementation of their recommendations by government, argues Marcus Shepheard.

03 January 2018

Some MPs, academics and student representatives have criticised Toby Young’s appointment to the board of the Office for Students. But what matters is how the board collectively performs and that it shows its independence from government, argues Daniel Thornton. 

02 January 2018

The Government’s latest Single Departmental Plans are a huge improvement on their predecessors. But there is still some work to do to make them truly useful, argues Gavin Freeguard.

30 December 2017

The resignation of Lord Adonis as Chair of the National Infrastructure Commission shows it’s time to put it on a statutory footing, argues Nick Davies.

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