Posts tagged with ‘ Spending review ’

Unclear line of sight

, 10 July 2013

Underneath the headline numbers announced in the Spending Round on 26 June, ‘efficiency savings’ accounted for a whopping £5 billion – or 43% – of the total £11.5 billion of cuts. What is far from clear is where those “efficiencies” will come from. The closest we can get is looking at the changes to...

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To 2016 and beyond: plan now, save later

, 2 July 2013

We may or may not get an emergency budget post-election. But whoever forms the government in May 2015 will need to come not only ready to launch a new spending review – but to do it very differently from the 2010 CSR and this week’s one year addendum. The cumulative cuts non-protected departments have...

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Now for the hard part: Reviewing the Spending Round

, 1 July 2013

First, in our briefing note before the Chancellor’s speech we asked whether there be a lot of small ‘good news’ measures to disguise the overall impact, or whether he would craft a careful strategy which openly balances the inevitable pain in a politically sustainable way? While speaking of ‘tough choices’, the Chancellor preferred unsurprisingly...

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Whitehall’s still standing – but for how long?

, 26 June 2013

Whitehall has undergone huge changes since 2010 – both introducing major reforms and making big cuts to its own cost base. Sir Humphrey would be appalled. It is hard to overstate the reforming ambition of this Government. It has introduced Universal Credit, reforms to welfare, schools, the NHS, police, prisons and probation. And all...

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The spending round: What to watch for on Wednesday

, 25 June 2013

Outside Whitehall local authorities are bracing themselves for big cuts, with some speculating they could lose as much as 12% from their central grants. There will also be a chance to glimpse the more distant, post-election future. Watch what happens to the ringfences. Some may remain intact (maybe schools). Others may survive for now...

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Investable politics: will the spending review do enough to attract private capital?

, 25 June 2013

The announcement is likely to be an important step in meeting pressing infrastructure needs in areas reliant on public funding (e.g. road maintenance). But it will fail to tackle the root causes of the feeble track record of infrastructure investment in the UK, namely the lack of an institutional platform that supports the creation...

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The changing structure of public spending – accident or design?

, 2 November 2010

In 2006/07, I suspect very few people would have agreed that the government should: increase the share of our national income spent on pensioner benefits, the NHS and overseas aid through reduced spend on education, law and order, defence in the event of an unexpected recession, finance the interest on the debt through further reductions...

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What to make of the Spending Review speech?

, 21 October 2010

What we heard certainly had one key ingredient. It sketched out a long term future, one of the key requests emerging from our Citizen’s Jury work in July. There was an emphasis on growth, and ways to get there – particularly protecting science and education, which has strong echos of Sweden and Finland’s successful...

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Spending Review: can transparency trump temptation?

, 18 October 2010

Up to now, the message from the Coalition government has largely been doom and gloom. However, in the last few days there have been a lot of ‘good news’ stories around the Spending Review, such as protecting schools and lesser than expected defence cuts.

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