Posts tagged with ‘ elected mayors ’

Why I Wrote to Eric Pickles

, 1 September 2011

Over the last year I have travelled around England’s greatest cities talking to more than sixty five business and voluntary sector leaders, local authority chief executives, journalists and councillors. The picture of city governance I have bought back is decidedly mixed; ranging from ambitious and strategic leadership to chaos and stagnation. Everywhere there was...

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Why the government needs to improve the mayoral offer

, 21 June 2011

On our tour of these 11 cities we were told by chief executives, officials, councillors, business and voluntary sector leaders alike that elected mayors could offer greater accountability and clear leadership at a local level, but that the mayoral offer to local authorities needs to be more clearly defined.  Yesterday we got more clarity...

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Last week’s mayoral elections and the future of urban governance

, 10 May 2011

Last week the nation emphatically rejected AV as a way to elect its MPs. On the same day voters in Middlesbrough, Mansfield, Bedford, Torbay and, for the first time, Leicester used a form of AV (the supplementary vote) to elect five executive mayors.

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Leicester: The real constitutional revolution of 2011?

, 4 May 2011

Without much national fanfare, Leicester will tomorrow become the largest city in England outside London to elect a mayor to run its affairs. In doing so, it could pave the way for Birmingham and other major cities outside the capital to follow suit in short order.

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A tale of two knights

, 28 March 2011

Manchester boasts the greatest concentration of students west of Moscow.

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Doncaster, not Leicester, calls the shots in Sheffield

, 11 March 2011

The Full Monty, the 1997 comic hit about a group of unemployed Sheffield steelworkers, leaves outsiders with three misleading long-term impressions about the city – that steelmaking died; that low value jobs were the only replacement; and that the better-off largely fled the city.

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99 and not out

, 4 March 2011

Leeds has more councillors over the age of 80 than under the age of 35. Not that it is short of councillors.  It has 99 in all, only one member fewer than the Senate of the United States.

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An elected mayor for Newcastle United?

, 28 February 2011

Of all the cities I have visited so far, Newcastle is the least enthusiastic about reforming its system of government. Labour and the Lib Dems dominate the city council and I could not identify a single councillor or MP from either party in favour of the mayoral proposition.

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They may have King Kenny, but would Liverpool want an elected mayor?

, 11 February 2011

Liverpool, the immensely wealthy “second city of the Empire,” has more Georgian buildings than Bath. Some of its historic grandeur has revived with the successful regeneration of the dockside and city centre, and the dysfunctional Derek Hatton Eighties are ancient history.

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Would an elected mayor change Birmingham and Coventry for the better?

, 31 January 2011

A million people, an annual budget of £4bn – yet an unemployment rate of 10 per cent and among the highest concentrations of poverty in the country.

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