Posts tagged with ‘ Coalition Government ’

50 ways to leave a coalition – and how to govern in the final phase

, 28 November 2013

These questions – and more – are the subject of a seminar at the Institute for Government – ‘50 Ways to Leave a Coalition’. In practice, there may not be 50 distinct scenarios, but as our panellists from the Netherlands, Ireland, Germany and Sweden will illustrate, there are quite a range of potential endgames....

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5 days – or longer – in May 2015

, 30 May 2013

No one has the faintest idea what the election result will be in 2015 but we could easily have another hung parliament – and the experience of 2010 will influence the expectations and behaviour of politicians, the media and the markets. Andrew Adonis, a Labour negotiator in 2010, has always maintained that a Lab/Lib...

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How 2015 will be very different from 2010

, 10 November 2011

The 2015 general election is going to be very different from 2010. The unexpected events of the ‘five days in May’ leading to the formation of the first Coalition government for 65 years have provided many lessons – and pointers to problems which can be avoided next time. The existence of the coalition –...

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Special Treatment? Why the coalition is appointing more special advisers

, 18 October 2011

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg is in the process of appointing around half a dozen additional special advisers (SpAds). This will apparently take the overall number of SpAds across Whitehall to around 80, above the level at the end of the Labour administration (and not counting other political appointees within the civil service, let...

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Clegg comes through for the Conservatives on Constitutional Reform

At a joint Constitution Unit/Institute for Government seminar on 11 July I developed three propositions: The Conservatives are just as much a party of constitutional reform as the Lib Dems, but this has never been acknowledged, not least by themselves. Nick Clegg in taking the lead on the whole of the government’s constitutional reform...

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The real battle for power in Scotland and Wales

, 12 April 2011

The aftermath of last year’s general election proved something of a shock to the Westminster village.

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Forming the government: the lessons from May 2010

, 28 January 2011

Almost everyone who took part has had their say (apart from Gordon Brown) and there has been growing debate on the lessons to be learnt. The Cabinet Office has produced its own view of the implications as part of the draft Cabinet Manual, whilst the Commons’ Political and Constitutional Reform Committee is the first...

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How ‘inevitable’ was the Con-Lib Dem Coalition?

, 30 November 2010

The electoral arithmetic of the election result – with the Tories as big gainers and Labour as big losers – always tipped the odds against a Labour / Lib Dem coalition. This is not least since it would have depended on the support of smaller groups on a day-to-day basis to win Commons votes.

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Yes, Prime Minister on stage: the verdict

, 30 September 2010

Yes, Prime Minister is one of those rare television programmes that shaped the way we look at the world. For many people, the experience of governing is still defined by Sir Humphrey’s scheming and Jim Hacker’s spluttering. And it was superbly, wickedly, funny.

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Why Cameron and Clegg need to reflect on the working of the coalition

, 16 September 2010

The coalition has, so far, worked much better than anyone could have predicted before May — thanks obviously to the harmonious lead of David Cameron and Nick Clegg but also to the initial work by the Conservative and Liberal Democrat negotiators and by Sir Gus O’Donnell and his team in the Cabinet Office.

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