Posts tagged with ‘ behavioural economics ’

MINDSPACE grows up – behavioural economics in government

, 6 January 2014

The report was originally commissioned by the last Labour government which hasn’t stopped a few members of the current opposition expressing degrees of scepticism about the way in which this government has enthusiastically taken up its techniques. The soon to be spun-out Behavioural Insights Team, established by David Cameron under MINDSPACE author, and former...

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Moneyball regulation

, 2 April 2013

For those unfamiliar with the book or film, Moneyball author Michael Lewis celebrates the success of a baseball manager, Billy Beane, who works with a statistics-obsessed colleague to transform the fortunes of his team, pushing them from second-tier to the top of the league. Beane’s secret was to discard the dogmas and intuitions of...

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Guest blog: Accountability under the spotlight

, 27 March 2013

One permanent secretary said “appearing before the PAC doesn’t change the price of fish”. Officials at HMRC and the Care Quality Commission may take a different view but it remains a fair question. Would defining better the respective roles of ministers and civil servants transform things? Will the latest civil service reforms make all...

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Getting into the policy MINDSPACE

, 16 December 2010

Since the Institute published its MINDSPACE report in March, there has been an explosion of interest and activity around behavioural economics. Most notably, my co-author David Halpern now heads up a new Behavioural Insights Team in the Cabinet Office, which is tasked with ‘applying behavioural economics to policy in a systematic way’.

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No 2 to No 10: taking MINDSPACE to Downing Street

, 13 October 2010

The Behavioural Insight Team – or ‘nudge’ unit, as Ministers call it – is about applying behavioural economics and social psychology to policy in a systematic way.

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