Lord Browne – Successes but ragged at the edges

, 18 November 2014

What is striking is how Lord Browne and other prominent business figures who are lead non-executive directors on 17 Whitehall boards have gained acceptance from departmental permanent secretaries – the very group who most strongly resisted their introduction by Francis Maude in 2010. Cynics might see this as producer capture, but there are positive...

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Charting the challenges for the next Government

, 18 November 2014

The Institute for Government has today published Whitehall Monitor 2014, which charts government in over 120 graphs. It shows what government looks like in 2014, how it has changed since 2010, and how transparent it is – but also some of the challenges it will face after the 2015 election. Here we highlight the...

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That the question be not now put

, 12 November 2014

In order to understand the parliamentary procedure which Yvette Cooper, the Shadow Home Secretary, used during the debate on the European Arrest Warrant (EAW) opt-in on Monday you need to start by understanding the normal process of debate in the House of Commons.

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Resolving confusion: the unaddressed issue of public bodies reform

, 12 November 2014

Three years on from the passing of the Coalition’s government’s Public Bodies Act and a period of reform in the UK, how far has the system of arm’s-length government in the UK improved? The answer of course, depends on what the diagnosis of the original problem was.

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The National Security Council – its history and its future

, 6 November 2014

The National Security Council was one of the coalition government’s first creations in May 2010. The Institute for Government and Whitehall History project’s new paper, The National Security Council: national security at the centre of government, traces a century of developments in national security coordination, culminating in the creation of the NSC and...

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Patchwork Britain

, 5 November 2014

Greater Manchester has won itself more powers in return for introducing a directly elected mayor. The move confirms that politicians are learning what works when trying to decentralise power. And there are several signs suggesting that decentralisation will not stop here.

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