Quick fix or masterplan: interpreting machinery of government changes

, 19 July 2016

One of the notable features of David Cameron’s time in office was the stability of Whitehall structures. The new PM has instead embarked on some big changes – creating two new departments, abolishing one, and engaging in a significant restructuring.  History suggests these come at an immediate price of disruption and distraction and that the...

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Brexit Brief: negotiating the UK’s exit from the EU

, 19 July 2016

What? The withdrawal agreement will cover immediate issues such as the rights of EU citizens in the UK and of UK citizens abroad, the relocation of EU agencies currently based in the UK, and how to allocate unspent funds due to be received by UK regions and farmers. These are the negotiations that are...

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Ministers reflect: on the private office

, 15 July 2016

New ministers, new secretaries of state in particular, mean a huge change in Whitehall departments: not just in policy direction, but also in style and tone. Right at the centre of that is the private office, the “hinge between the secretary of state and the department at large.” They will play a vital role...

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Theresa’s Ten

, 15 July 2016

It appears that Theresa May has made a clean sweep of advisers in Number 10. Her long-time aides, Nick Timothy and Fiona Hill, are now joint Chiefs-of-Staff, a role first created by Tony Blair for Jonathan Powell and carried on by David Cameron for Ed Llewellyn. The advantage is that not only do the...

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Government reshuffle 2016 – live-blog

, 13 July 2016

Follow us on Twitter for updates, too: @instituteforgov This page may take a short while to load – please bear with us!

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The UK in Iraq: a case study in policy failure?

, 13 July 2016

While much of the IfG’s research on policy implementation and policy challenges relates to domestic policy, many of the same issues arise in foreign policy, and four lessons can be drawn from Chilcot. Given the scale of the Chilcot report, and the fact that its conclusions are spread through the 2.6m word document rather than...

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