Archive for Jill Rutter

Jill joined the Institute as a Whitehall secondee in September 2009 and was co-author of the Institute's report on arm's length bodies, Read Before Burning (July 2010). She has also been part of the better policy making project. Before joining the Institute for Government, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, where she was Press Secretary, Private Secretary to the Chief Secretary and Chancellor, as well as working on areas such as tax, local government finance and debt and export finance. She spent two and a half years seconded to the No.10 Policy Unit (1992-94) where she oversaw health, local government and environment issues. More about Jill

Jill Rutter’s Posts

After Nick: what the Treasury (and the rest of us) needs in its next permanent secretary

, 4 January 2016

The Treasury is always one of the most powerful departments in Whitehall – but at the moment it stands head and shoulders above the rest. That is in part due to the Chancellor – with a writ that runs over any areas of policy he is interested in (infrastructure, the supply side, decentralisation and...

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Ministers reflect: on the Treasury

, 30 December 2015

Inside the Treasury The minister with Treasury experience we interviewed, Mark Hoban, was impressed with the way the Treasury prepared for new ministers and thought his background helped him make that transition: “I was financially literate, which was important, I had run projects, some of those skills about managing people and managing teams I’d...

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Time to end Budgets’ special treatment

, 18 November 2015

What is most interesting is why the politics – and policy making – around Budgets are treated so differently from other important government decisions. As George Osborne contemplates how to extricate himself from his tax credits problem next week, maybe it’s time for him to think about whether he – and the country –...

Posted in Better policy making | 1 Comment »

Divided by a common deficit – comparing UK and US infrastructure problems

, 30 October 2015

In the week George Osborne announced the creation of the National Infrastructure Commission and just two weeks after we debated how best to address long-term infrastructure decisions in the UK, I attended a Carnegie Endowment for International Peace forum on American Job Creation and Infrastructure in Washington DC, with a high-powered cast list including...

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Getting government to show its workings

, 20 October 2015

The last Parliament saw the creation of the Office for Budget Responsibility, the Independent Commission on Aid Impact, the Regulatory Policy Committee and the What Works centres – all designed to ensure that policy was based on robust evidence and assumptions. But this progress in specific areas was not translated into a transparent approach...

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A porous Civil Service – will insiders finally help outsiders succeed in Whitehall?

, 1 October 2015

At Institute for Government event last week, Cabinet Secretary Sir Jeremy Heywood was eloquent about his vision for a more porous Civil Service: “I don’t think we are going to have as many people coming in at age 21, working for 30-odd years or 40 years; people will want more, or at least the...

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Making tax policy better: the case for strengthening the Office of Tax Simplification

, 1 September 2015

The Office of Tax Simplification (OTS) has always been the poor relation of the Office of Budget Responsibility (OBR). The OBR has a profile – it is a pledge of reassurance to both voters and markets of the government’s commitment to fiscal discipline. When it was created, it was rapidly put on a statutory...

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Not child’s play: what does the Kid’s Company case tell us about government’s relations with the third sector?

, 5 August 2015

Successive governments have become reliant on external providers for services that were once the province of state provision. That has brought many benefits: innovation, better focus on users, more diversity of provision and more flexibility – as well as efficiencies and economies. But it also brings risks – in particular, that government becomes dependent...

Posted in New models of governance and public services | 1 Comment »

No contest – the time has come to ditch or reboot the Ministerial Contestable Policy Fund

, 19 June 2015

One of the flagship announcements in the 2012 Civil Service Reform Plan was the creation of a ministerial contestable policy find “to give ministers access to external policy advice”. The first outing was the IPPR study on accountability – but the patchy information provided on use of the fund to date...

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Speaking truth to power – from the crossbenches

, 1 June 2015

Newly ennobled Lord Kerslake has lobbed a hand grenade at his successor by taking the government to task over its housing proposals. But it also raises questions of how quickly civil servants should go public on their former responsibilities.

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