Archive for Jill Rutter

Jill joined the Institute as a Whitehall secondee in September 2009 and was co-author of the Institute's report on arm's length bodies, Read Before Burning (July 2010). She has also been part of the better policy making project. Before joining the Institute for Government, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, where she was Press Secretary, Private Secretary to the Chief Secretary and Chancellor, as well as working on areas such as tax, local government finance and debt and export finance. She spent two and a half years seconded to the No.10 Policy Unit (1992-94) where she oversaw health, local government and environment issues. More about Jill

Jill Rutter’s Posts

The Cameron centre takes shape

, 22 May 2015

Second term prime ministers have a big advantage – they know what they need to make government work for them – and are not bound by reckless pledges made in opposition. So it is interesting to see the choices the prime minister is making.

Posted in Parliament and the political process | No Comments »

Age of major-ity: what might David Cameron learn from John Major’s experience?

, 8 May 2015

Both David Cameron and George Osborne had ringside seats as advisers in the Major government. They will remember how grim it can get. Major’s problems started even before his poll victory, with the decision – which seemed principled at the time – not to rush his (as it seemed at the time) EU negotiating...

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No burning platforms: do this election’s manifestos suggest parties are learning to love quangos?

, 29 April 2015

In the run-up to the 2010 election there was a clear consensus on the need to rein in the quango state. David Cameron had called it inefficient and unaccountable. Gordon Brown, as prime minister, published a white paper promising reform. And even the Lib Dems were sceptics. This year’s manifestos strike a different tone....

Posted in New models of governance and public services | No Comments »

Educating Jeremy: how will the new Civil Service master’s course make a difference?

, 13 April 2015

The Civil Service has always rather looked down on the idea that formal qualifications can help you do the job as policy maker better. True, increasing numbers reach the top entering as professional economists. And the current government, although putting the old National School for Government onto the quango bonfire has set up both...

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Raging against the machine: how prime ministers can deal with the frustration of not getting things done

, 13 March 2015

In an interview with the FT today, David Cameron complains about the “buggeration factor” of trying to “force policy through the system, with its consultations and reviews”. Earlier in the week, Lord Falconer set out Labour’s plans to avoid such frustration, if it wins office, by creating more powerful support around the PM. Both...

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Captain overboard: Can Tony Abbott survive flawed judgement calls?

, 6 February 2015

British audiences love Aussie soaps. And a classic one is playing out down under right now as Prime Minister Tony Abbott attempts to fend off a leadership challenge triggered by the impact of some disastrous ‘captain’s calls’ which underline the importance of getting prime ministerial style right.

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Oops, she does it again: now Theresa May takes over the struggling passport agency

, 29 September 2014

In April 2013, the Home Secretary announced that the troubled UK Borders Agency would be reabsorbed back into the Home Office. At the time we commented that this move alone did not address the underlying issues. Now, 18 months later, the UK Passport Office faces the same fate.

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Turning on the TAP: will the government’s new diversity action plan deliver the wanted pipeline of female talent?

, 5 September 2014

“I would not want to join the culture. It’s really insidious and I have witnessed too many women fail. Women I have admired, women who have succeeded previously. All torn apart, all gone. It’s a hideous male macho culture at the top with favourites and deals in smoke filled rooms. It’s the first time...

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Posted in A more effective Whitehall | 1 Comment »

Bringing a post – and a policy – into disrepute

, 29 August 2014

The last thing the advocates of Police and Crime Commissioners needed was the unedifying prospect of Shaun Wright grimly hanging on to his position as PCC for South Yorkshire in the wake of the Rotherham scandal, being disowned by his own party and denounced by the Home Secretary and the Prime Minister.

Posted in New models of governance and public services | 1 Comment »

Family friendly government?

, 18 August 2014

The middle of August may not sound like the best time to announce a new policy initiative – to subject all government policy to a family impact test. But that is what David Cameron has just done. In a speech to the Royal College of General Practitioners he said: “I want every government department...

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Posted in Better policy making | 1 Comment »